MFWK Sun Unit and ShillerMath

The past two weeks were full of ups and downs. There was the day that Wigglebutt kept strutting around like a proud peacock because of his sun craft that he had done after I modified it to help him be able to claim ownership over it by precutting strips so he could rip them off himself.

Then there were the dozens of meltdowns. He headbutted new holes into our walls. Plus he ripped out one of my toenails. Yeah…. ouch. Big time ouch. That is life with a developmentally disabled child. There are going to be moments of happiness and moments of frustration.

There was the day that I got to witness the spark in Snicklebritches’s eyes when she grasped that numbers represent groups of items; not just the order of items. Before, she could read numbers and count to thirty. However, up to just recently, she seemed to think the purpose of numerals were that they represent order, such as the seven days of the week/creation; we are the 4th house on the left; the number 3 checkout is the third one over from the door, and so on. As an orderly person,she loves numbers because they represent a specific order. Now, after the MFWK lesson using pennies, something seemed to click in her mind. Now she understands that numerals represent amounts as well as order. She now understands that although five pennies lined up counts to five, it also means she has five pennies, no matter which order she has them in. If it’s in a stack, it’s still five pennies. If she has ten dolls (she has OCD, each doll must be in a specific order), it doesn’t matter which order they’re in, that’s still a group of ten dolls. If the dolls are in a pile, that’s still ten dolls. I am so blessed that I was the one to witness the light come on in mind. This is why so many teachers love being teachers. I’m just saying what a blessing it is to witness my own daughter learn something so fundamental to her future; that major Ah-ha moment was mine to treasure.

Speaking of treasured moments, the sun kept on hiding behind clouds, but no worries. I took the opportunity to point out that the sun is not gone. Even though we cannot see the sun, we see evidence it’s there. Warmth. Light. Rays. Bright edges of the cloud. Wind. I compared this to how Jesus is not seen, but we feel him and see evidence of him all around and within each one of us. We were having a picnic and Neva exclaimed “Jesus is in my drink too?” Ha! Yes and no. We can drink in remembrance of Jesus, when you are old enough, you will take communion. (And that lesson whizzed right over her head.)

As for ShillerMath, she finished the first few lessons and is stuck on learning left and right. It is essential that she understand left/right, so we are going to take our time helping her figure that out. The beauty of homeschooling is that we have no deadlines. I don’t have to, as the teacher, declare “oh well, we’re out of time. Let’s move on to the next lesson” and then leave the child trailing behind because the child never grasped a crucial foundational concept, such as this one. The rest of the program will assume she understands left and right. If it takes a month for Snicklebritches to finally get it… so be it. We have plenty of time.

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Light and Shadows sensory box

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Our shadows

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The sun hid itself from us the whole two weeks.Image

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With these molly bang books, I added references to Jesus, i.e. I am the living sunlight inside you (the sun talking), I said モJesus is the living sunlight inside you.

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These books are ones that I’ve narrowed down from the library that fits my daughter’s reading level, aligns with our Christian young earth beliefs, and presented factual information on the sun and shadows.

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She insisted on putting her own spin on it, using her handprints. Hey… it’s HER craft.

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Thank you mamamonkeys and 1+1+1=1 (Links below)

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Here is how I adapted the sun craft for my special needs son; I cut strips into the paper and allowed Wigglebutt to rip the strips off the paper and then he followed the MFW instructions of the mathematical pattern as specified in the teacher’s manual.Image

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Good job Snicklebritches!

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Thank you Dawn!

Thank you Carisa! 

And thank you to the creators of these videos.

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Creation Unit

We are wrapping up the Creation Unit. It was a sweet introduction and we all enjoyed it. We are beginning a tradition where after each Unit, the children will present their projects and information they learned to their dad. We just finished doing this and Snicklebritches read “On the 7th day, God read.” not “rested”. That was cute.

Fair warning. I am a new blogger. I am not good with formatting. I will learn as I go. Here come the pictures.

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Snicklebritches was able to do her Creation book independently. She truly made it HER OWN.   This is why hers look all messy. And that is exactly why I love it! 

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Here is WiggleButt out at the park with us looking for things God created.

 

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God created leaves and berries. And flowers.
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God created ducks. 
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Their Creation books will become keepsakes. These are precious and I love their handprints they made in the land one.

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Man made this footpath. Not God.

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Snicklebritches working on her numbers of the days of Creation. This  banner is now hanging up in her room and she is very proud of it.

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I put together a sensory bin for creation unit. It has floral grass, dyed blue rice, white beans, and black beans. We read through Gerald McDermott’s book “Creation” as they play with the sensory bin.

ImageImageWigglebutt required heavy hands-on assistance with all his work, This is part of the package when you choose to home-educate your severely developmentally disabled child.

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The children enjoyed this gentle begin to their kindergarten year. Snicklebritches knows her numbers and she knows how to read, but this is perfect because she lacks the fine motor skills to write and to enunciate certain sounds. Kindergarten will give her time to gain the fine motor skills necessary for the more intense first grade program MFW offers. It also gives Wigglebutt a chance to learn alongside his younger sister at first.

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Both the children enjoyed this book, but as you can see, Wigglebutt hogged the week’s book to himself. He loved the bright crisp colorful pages that was busy enough to keep him engaged without sending him into sensory overload. His sister Snicklebritches loved how the letters were easy to read to herself and she enjoyed reading it aloud to us just to show us that she could. I tried to get a video clip, but she is still shy about reading on camera.

There it is- what we’ve done the past two weeks.